Presentation T P36

T P36 (Poster Presentation):
Can functional capacity tests predict future work capacity in patients with whiplash-associated disorders?

Presented by: Maurizio Alen Trippolini

Authors

Trippolini MA1,2 , Dijkstra PU2,3, Côté P4,5 , Scholz-Odermatt SM6, Geertzen JHB2, Reneman MF2

  1. Department of Work Rehabilitation, Rehaklinik Bellikon, Suva Care, Bellikon, Switzerland
  2. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Center for Rehabilitation, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  3. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  4. Division of Epidemiology, Della Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  5. University of Ontario, Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oshawa, Canada
  6. Central Office for Statistics in Accident Insurance (SSUV), Lucerne, Switzerland

Abstract

Background

The prognostic validity of FCE tests to predict future work capacity in patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) is unknown. The aim of the study is to determine whether Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) tests can predict future work capacity of patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD).

Methods

In this prospective cohort study sick listed workers with WAD (Grade I and II) 6 to 12 weeks after injury were referred for an interdisciplinary assessment that included FCE tests. Patients performed 8 work-related FCE tests e.g. hand grip strength, material handling, repetitive reaching, postural tolerance, overhead working, and ambulation.Work capacity (WC; 0-100%) was measured at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after testing. Correlation coefficients between FCE tests and WC were calculated. A linear mixed model analysis was used to assess the association between FCE and future WC.

Results

In total 267 patients with WAD grade I or II participated in the study. Mean WC increased over time from 20.8 (SD 27.6) at baseline to 32.3 (SD 38.4), 51.3 (SD 42.8), 65.6 (SD 42.2), 83.2 (SD 35.0) at 1, 3, 6, 12 months follow up respectively. Correlation coefficients between FCE tests and WC ranged between r=0.06 (lifting low at 12 months follow up) to r=0.39 (walking speed at 3 months). Strength of correlations decreased over time. FCE tests did not predict WC at follow-up. The predictors of WC were ln (time) course (β = 23.74), mother language (β=5.49), work capacity at baseline (β=1.01), and self-reported disability (β=-0.20). Two interaction terms ln (time) x workcapacity (β=-0.19), and ln (time) x self-reported disability (β=-0.21) were significant predictors of WC.

Conclusions

FCE tests performed within 3 months after WAD injury are associated to WC at baseline, but do not predict future WC, whereas time course, mother language, WC at baseline, and self-reported disability do predict future WC. Additionally, interaction between time course WC at baseline and self-reported disability respectively predicted future WC.

Schedule Details

Tuesday September 30
12:45 - 13:45 Poster Viewing
Session: Work capacity / ability