Presentation W P25

W P25 (Poster Presentation):
Need for recovery among on-call workers

Presented by: Hardy van de Ven

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Authors

van de Ven HA1, Bültmann U1, de Looze MP2,3, Koolhaas W1, Kantermann T4,5, Brouwer S1, van der Klink JJL1

  1. Department of Health Sciences, Division of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands
  2. TNO Healthy Living, Hoofddorp, the Netherlands
  3. Research Institute Move, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  4. Chronobiology, Center for Behaviour and Neurosciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands
  5. Institute for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Clinical Centre Lüdwig-Maximilians University Munich, Munich, Germany

Abstract

Background

On-call work characterizes about 20% of the EU working-time arrangements, but few studies have examined the impact of on-call work on health and well-being. Specifically, it is not known whether need for recovery differs whether a worker was on-call or not, and whether a worker was actually called or not. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to 1) examine whether need for recovery differs between workers (i) not on-call, (ii) on-call but not called, and (iii) on-call and called, and 2) investigate associations between health, work and social characteristics with need for recovery among the three working scenarios (i-iii).

Methods

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among N=280 Dutch on-call workers, assessing age, and health, work and social characteristics. In addition, need for recovery and sleep quality were assessed for each of the three working scenarios (i-iii). Wilcoxon signed rank tests were applied to detect differences in need for recovery between the three working scenarios (i-iii). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine associations between age, and health, work and social characteristics with need for recovery among the three working scenarios (i-iii).

Results

The final sample comprised N=169 on-call workers. Need for recovery differed significantly between the three working scenarios (p<0.05), with lowest need for recovery for scenario (i) ‘not on-call’ (mean 16.72, SD 21.87) and highest need for recovery for scenario (iii) ‘on-call and called’ (mean 30.36, SD 29.74). Poor mental health (i: OR 4.46, 95% CI 1.40-14.16; ii: OR 4.26, 95% CI 1.47-12.30; iii: OR 5.18, 95%CI 1.87-14.33) and more work family interference (a: OR 5.75, 95% CI 1.95-16.95; b: OR 4.92, 95% CI 1.74-13.93; c: OR 4.12, 95%CI 1.46-11.63) were significantly associated with higher need for recovery for all three working scenarios (i-iii), higher work demands (ii: OR 3.25, 95% CI 1.18-8.93; ii: OR 3.11, 95%CI 1.15-8.38) only when on-call (scenarios ii and iii).

Conclusions

The results suggest that the mere possibility of being called might affect need for recovery, especially for workers with poor mental health, higher work demands and more work family interference. Future studies are warranted to explore these relationships in more detail.

Schedule Details

Wednesday October 1
13:00 - 14:00 Poster Viewing
Session: Varia